Office of Mayor William Peduto
City Releases 2016 Paving Plans And New Transportation Asset Management System
Tech upgrades feature comprehensive pavement condition assessment

PITTSBURGH, PA (March 24, 2016) - The City of Pittsburgh Department of Public Works (DPW) has released its 2016 street paving list.

The projected plan for the entire paving season - approximately 49.5 miles - is available to the public via the Department of Public Works Street Paving Program website. The site includes an interactive map that details the city’s paving plan so residents can see exactly what street segments will be paved. The city’s paving plan will undergo minor revisions throughout the summer and fall as needs change. The website will be updated with revisions as they arise.

The program has several components: milling and paving of primary, secondary, and tertiary streets throughout the city; maintenance activities such as pothole patching and crack sealing to extend the life of city streets; the construction of handicap ramps in conjunction with paving projects; concrete and brick repairs; and thermoplastic line striping of crosswalks in high-traffic pedestrian areas.

The total budget allocated for the 2016 program is $14,887,943 (increased from $12,250,000 in 2015) and includes $240,000 of Allegheny Regional Asset District (ARAD) funds.

The Department of Public Works is focused on improving the way it manages investments to the city’s physical assets, including roads, buildings, city steps, playgrounds, and parks. DPW recently implemented a new cloud-based asset management system, Cartegraph, that is used to track work and plan for future infrastructure investments. To support improved management of the city’s road network, the City of Pittsburgh has contracted with Cartegraph, Inc. to conduct a comprehensive pavement condition assessment of all 2,400 lane miles of city-owned streets. As part of the assessment process, Cartegraph staff will travel every mile of street using specially equipped vehicles that collect detailed information on twelve different distress criteria, including previous patching, potholes, and alligator cracking.

For each distress criteria, Cartegraph will measure the extent of the degradation and the severity seen within each block. Detailed condition information will allow DPW to complete more targeted maintenance activities like crack sealing while also helping the department to prioritize resurfacing work in a way that is equitable and data driven. Cartegraph is scheduled to begin the data collection effort in early April and will deliver complete pavement condition data to the city in late summer.

The Cartegraph asset management system is the latest technological upgrade -- following the Snow Plow Tracker, 311 Mobile App, Park Permit Site, PLI Property Violations Site -- demonstrating the Peduto administration’s continued focus on making lasting investments in innovation and technology that will transform how the city operates for decades. A technology based system like Cartegraph is the kind of resource that would fit seamlessly into a Smart City plan.

Having comprehensive street condition data will allow the city to establish a multi-year paving plan that can be shared with local utilities, increasing opportunities for coordination and reducing project conflicts.  A renewed commitment to utility coordination resulted in an additional 16 lane miles of city streets being paved curb-to-curb during the 2015 paving season. Preliminary paving projects are shared with local utility companies to 1) ensure they do not conflict with planned projects and 2) identify opportunities to work together to share costs for street restoration.

The pavement condition assessment will cost $222,766.

The Department of Public Works coordinates closely with a paving contractor to develop a project schedule for the paving season. Work is scheduled to minimize the impact on residents and businesses. In most cases, milling and paving occurs during daylight hours. In high traffic areas such as the Central Business District and Oakland, work may be scheduled overnight.

The schedule accounts for planned events such as the Pittsburgh Marathon while also considering the substantial work that local utilities conduct in city streets during the summer construction season.  

The project schedule is subject to change throughout the season due to changes in the timing of utility projects, inclement weather, special events, and unforeseen emergencies.  

###

 

what's this?