CITIPARKS

North Shore Riverfront Park

North Shore Riverfront Park

 

NORTH SHORE RIVERFRONT PARK AMENITIES

 

 

Biking icon

Biking

Walking icon

Walking

Trails icon

Trails

Riverfront Access icon

Riverfront Access

Public Art icon

Public Art

Scenic Views icon

Scenic Views

 

The North Shore Riverfront Park is a gem of our Allegheny and Ohio riverbanks. The park offers spectacular views of the Downtown skyline in the North Shore’s stadium area. In total, the park includes 11.25 acres of public green space. Specifically, the park contains 3.1 acres of lawn and 2.1 acres of planting area. The remaining acreage is dedicated to a riverwalk, pier, walkways, a water feature, memorials, and public art.

Once known exclusively as Roberto Clemente Park, this park was fully redeveloped as part of the joint construction of Heinz Field and PNC Park.

North Shore Riverfront Park is owned and maintained in cooperation with the Sports & Exhibition Authority of Pittsburgh & Allegheny County. The region's public venue Authority.


The Three Rivers Heritage Trail is Pittsburgh's signature trail system. The 33-mile system is maintained by the Department of Public Works in cooperation with the Friends of the Riverfront.

The trail runs along the banks of our Three Rivers and is a popular walking, biking, running, and tourist destination. Collectively, the trail forms portions of the Great Allegheny Passage, a 150 mile passage that connects Pittsburgh to the nation's Capital - Washington, DC.

The North Side portion of the trail was renamed after former Mayor Thomas J. Murphy Jr. in 2019. Mayor Murphy was integral in leading the redevelopment of the North Shore and the creation of our riverfront trails.

Completed in 2007, the Water Steps are a popular destination feature in the North Shore Riverfront Park. The steps offer a playful element to the Park and a creative display of water landscaping.

The Water Steps are constructed of nearly 500 blocks of sandstone and more than 1,000 smaller pieces of sandstone. The Water Steps are approximately 40 feet wide at the top, but broaden as the steps descend. Many children and families gather there to relax and enjoy the views of the Downtown skyline.

The Water Steps are owned and maintained by the Sports & Exhibition Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. For more information visit: North Shore Riverfront Park.

The Tribute to Children was the vision of the late Cordelia May, who was a longtime friend of Fred and Joanne Rogers.

Upon Mr. Rogers’ passing, Ms. May wished to honor Fred at a location where his legacy could be remembered. The intent of Tribute to Children was to create an easily accessible, highly visible, new destination that would attract families and visitors to Pittsburgh and serve as a source of pride to its residents. For more information visit: https://www.pgh-sea.com/index.php?path=art-ns.

Public parking for view of the memorial is available along North Shore Drive.
 

The Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, Inc. is a nonprofit organization consisting of police officers, survivors and private citizens who worked to build and maintain the Law Enforcement Officers Memorial – tribute to fallen members of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police as well as others from Allegheny County. The original LEOM was dedicated August 25, 1996, and was located near Three Rivers Stadium. 

Further to the redevelopment of the North Shore, the Sports & Exhibition Authority worked with the LEOM for the modifications needed to be reinstalled in the Park. The Memorial is owned by the LEOM organization with ongoing maintenance provided by LEOM, Inc.
 

The City of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County, working with local Veterans organizations, formed the WWII Veterans of Allegheny County Memorial Fund.

In 2001, the Fund hosted a national design competition from which Larry Kirkland of Washington DC, and Design Workshop of Denver, CO, were selected for the project. After reviewing several sites throughout the region, a portion of the Great Lawn at the North Shore Riverfront Park was selected in cooperation with the Sports & Exhibition Authority.

The Sports & Exhibition Authority accepted ownership of the Memorial on July 31, 2015 and is responsible for ongoing maintenance. For more information visit: North Shore Riverfront Public Art and www.worldwar2pgh.org.

The original Vietnam Veterans Monument was installed on the North Shore on November 11, 1987.

Further to the development of the North Shore, the Sports & Exhibition Authority worked with the City of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Allegheny County Vietnam Veterans Monument Fund Charitable Trust for the modifications needed to reinstall the Monument in its new site in the Park. It was rededicated on June 23, 2002. 

The Monument is owned by the City of Pittsburgh, with capital repairs paid through an endowment with Pittsburgh Foundation.

The original Korean War Veterans Memorial was installed on the North Shore in July 27, 1999.

To further the development of our evolving North Shore, the Sports & Exhibition Authority worked with the City of Pittsburgh and the Korean Veterans of Western Pennsylvania Memorial Fund for the modifications needed to reinstall the Memorial in the new site in the Park. It was rededicated on July 27, 2001.

The Memorial is owned by the City of Pittsburgh.
 

The Langley Observatory Clock is the result of a public art program established by the Sports & Exhibition Authority at the onset of the North Shore Riverfront Park project. 

The program sought to use public art as a means of reintroducing people to the rivers, promoting cultural activities and enriching the City of Pittsburgh’s public art collection.

The title of the sculpture, Langley Observatory Clock, refers to the work of Samuel P. Langley. In 1870, Langley, Director of the Allegheny Observatory in Pittsburgh’s Riverview Park, created the Allegheny System - a standardized system of measuring and disseminating the accurate time. Langley used the observatory telescope and astronomical observations to set the time on a specifically designed clock. Using telegraph wires, Langley connected the observatory clock to a highly visible clock located at Pittsburgh's City Hall on Smithfield Street. By the end of the year, 42 railroads were provided a standard time through this system.