ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Blue Bin Program Aims to Make Recycling Easier

The City of Pittsburgh has launched a program to distribute 100,000+ blue recycling bins to residents and become bag free by 2023. The goal is to make recycling easier for residents and reduce recycling contamination. Each residence serviced by the Bureau of Environmental Services will receive a 32-gallon blue recycling bin with a tight-fitting lid attached and an information packet. All recycling bins will be manufactured in Pennsylvania by The Rehrig-Pacific Company.

 

Blue Bin Distribution Schedule

The program started in the fall of 2020 and will run through fall 2022. Residents will receive a mailer two weeks before receiving a blue bin. All single-family homes, duplexes, and apartments with five units or less are automatically eligible for a new recycling container through this program. Find out approximately when you will receive a blue bin:

 

Neighborhood Season Year
GarfieldFall2020
East LibertyFall2020
West OaklandSpring2021
Upper LawrencevilleSpring2021
Upper HillSpring2021
Terrace VillageSpring2021
Swisshelm ParkSummer2021
Strip DistrictSpring2021
Stanton HeightsSpring2021
Squirrel Hill SouthSummer2021
Squirrel Hill NorthSummer2021
South OaklandSpring2021
ShadysideSpring2021
Regent SquareSummer2021
Polish HillSpring2021
Point BreezeSummer2021
North OaklandSpring2021
MorningsideSpring2021
Middle HillSpring2021
Lower LawrencevilleSpring2021
Lincoln-Lemington-BelmarSummer2021
LarimerSummer2021
Homewood WestSummer2021
Homewood SouthSummer2021
Homewood NorthSummer2021
HazelwoodSummer2021
GreenfieldSummer2021
Glen HazelSummer2021
FriendshipSpring2021
East HillsSummer2021
Crawford-RobertsSpring2021
Central OaklandSpring2021
Central LawrencevilleSpring2021
BluffSpring2021
BloomfieldSpring2021
Bedford DwellingsSpring2021
WindgapFall2022
WestwoodFall2022
West EndFall2022
Troy HillFall2022
Summer HillFall2022
Spring Hill-City ViewFall2022
Spring GardenFall2022
Southside SlopesSpring2022
Southside FlatsSpring2022
South ShoreSpring2022
SheradenFall2022
RidgemontSpring2022
Perry SouthFall2022
Perry NorthFall2022
OverbrookSpring2022
OakwoodFall2022
Northview HeightsFall2022
North ShoreFall2022
New HomesteadSpring2022
Mount WashingtonSpring2022
Mount OliverSpring2022
Marshall-ShadelandFall2022
ManchesterFall2022
Lincoln PlaceSpring2022
KnoxvilleSpring2022
HaysSpring2022
FineviewFall2022
FairywoodFall2022
EsplenFall2022
ElliotFall2022
East CarnegieFall2022
East AlleghenyFall2022
Duquesne HeightsSpring2022
Crafton HeightsFall2022
ChateauFall2022
Chartiers CityFall2022
Central NorthsideFall2022
CarrickSpring2022
California-KirkbrideFall2022
BrooklineSpring2022
Brighton HeightsFall2022
Bon AirSpring2022
BeltzhooverSpring2022
BeechviewSpring2022
BanksvilleSpring2022
Arlington HeightsSpring2022
ArlingtonSpring2022
AllentownSpring2022
Allegheny WestFall2022
 Allegheny CenterFall2022

 

Recycling Contamination, and Why It Matters?

One of the biggest challenges facing recycling right now is contamination by wishful recycling or “wish-cycling”. This happens when non-recyclable objects are placed in the recycling bin with the wish it will be recycled. Additionally, recycling contamination occurs when food residue, liquids, and unacceptable materials (such as batteries, sharps, extra plastic bags, food waste, and greasy pizza boxes), are placed into the recycling can. Contaminants not only degrade the materials, boosting costs, but they can potentially cause harm to the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) and city employees.

 

Sign up for a Free Recycling Educational Webinar

Click the date to register on zoom


 

Bag Free in 2023

The City of Pittsburgh is making a significant shift away from a bag-based collection program. While the blue plastic bag has long been a part of the Pittsburgh recycling collection system, the city must stop packaging recyclables in plastic bags. Plastic bags can degrade recyclables making the materials tough to sort when delivered to the MRF.