BUREAU OF POLICE

Community Task Force on Police Reform graphic header

Task Force Recommended Actions Steps We Have Already Taken Steps We Plan To Take Anticipated Timeline
Eliminating Racial Disparities
Pittsburgh Bureau of Police (PBP) and the City of Pittsburgh should gather and analyze more data on routine police actions, in as rigorous a way as possible; subject these data to regular and comprehensive analysis; and use that analysis to locate the explanations or source of disparate outcomes.The PBP and City of Pittsburgh provide current data that is searchable through the Burgh's Eye View application. The website is linked here.Implement the new RMS program that provides tracking capabilites for the statistics requested. This will provide an easier method to provide data and analysis, and a wealth of information that can be analyzed for specific trends, patterns, outcomes, as requested.One Year
The PBP must commit itself to identifying all racial disparities in its routine actions; to requiring independent analysis of the data that show disparities, to identify the sources of these disparities, to account for them on either racial or other grounds; and for those that stem from race (i.e., for which no non-racial explanation is plausible) to creating specific plans to eliminate these disparities within one year, through changes in policy, practice, and actions.  Plans for taking action to remedy these disparities shall be available to the public, including through publication on City and PBP websites.Center for Police Equity completed and shared a report on the PBP regarding racial disparities using data from 2012-2017.PBP to partner with Institute of Politics (IOP) to determine the root of racial disparites in policing.12 months from signing of MOU
The PBP must identify and ally with an independent partner – for example, a university, free-standing think tank, or a private analytics firm with a stellar history – to perform the analysis necessary to determine which disparities are based, in whole or in part, on race or other non-justifiable categories, and to pinpoint the source of those disparities, and to recommend changes to eliminate them.  The City of Pittsburgh shall make appropriate funding necessary for this independent work on an ongoing basis for at least a period of five years.PBP has explored a partnership with an independent partner to analyze data.PBP to partner with IOP to determine the root of racial disparites in policing. Signing a MOU regarding information sharing and collaboration needs completed.1-2 months to complete MOU
The PBP must fill in the gaps in its data collection by routinely collecting data on the following police activities:The PBP and City of Pittsburgh provide current data that is searchable through the Burgh's Eye View application. The website is linked here.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements. 1 year
Review any perceived population bias using the most recent American Community Survey five-year annual averages, not single-year Census population data.The PBP currently uses US Government census data.
Collect and include in analysis and reports, data on pedestrian stops, uses of force beyond “come-along holds” and other low level uses, citations/warnings issued, summonses issued, and misdemeanor vs. felony arrests, broken out by race and gender.The PBP currently tracks many types of use of force, and has recently added "pointing of a firearm" as a tracked use of force. Citations, summons, warnings, and arrests are already tracked by race and gender.Complete
Require and include notation (by officers) and collection of data on reasons for traffic and pedestrian stops, arrests, and other police actions, including arrests by type of offense; specific factual basis for presence of probable cause and reasonable suspicion, when these standards are used for arrests, stops or searches, broken out by race and gender.The PBP currently tracks reasons, probable cause, and reasonable suspicion for traffic stops, arrests, and searches, which can be broken out by race and gender. The other information is not currently collected in all circumstances.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Separate breakouts of stop, search and arrest data for black and white juveniles vs. black and white adults.This data is currently partially collected, the data that is collected can be separated for review.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
For all events that include searches (e.g., stops with frisks, arrests accompanied by searches, etc.), a calculation of the hit rate – the rate at which officers find contraband, the nature of contraband (e.g., illegal gun, cannabis, cocaine, etc.) and (if applicable) amount of contraband, with hit rates broken out by race and gender.This data is currently partially collected, the data that is collected can be separated for review.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
All data categories to include black/white relative risk or odds ratios for routine police actions.This data is currently partially collected, the data that is collected can be separated for review.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Issue bi-monthly public reports assessing which PBP policies, programs, activities, tactics, or strategies are producing racial disparities, whether any non-racial explanations accounts for these disparities, and what is being done to remedy the situation.PBP currently issues an Annual Report. The website is linked herePBP has engaged the IOP, RAND and RTI to further investigate the root of racial disparities in PBP activity.18 months from MOU with Institute of Politics (IOP).
Create new and modify existing programs to support a culture of community policing.  The PBP has implemented a Community Engagement Office (CEO), as well as Neighborhood Resource Officers (NRO) and Community Resource Officers (CRO), which meet this requirement.Complete
Create a formal structure to establish and nurture a Community/Police Spiritual Leaders Council. The shared work of the police and the spiritual leaders will help strengthen partnership between community and policeThe PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal. Currently restructuring the current Chaplaincy Program to more reflect the Pennsylvania State Police's program.6 months
Strengthen relationships between spiritual leaders and police so that spiritual leaders can represent community concerns to police, foster good communication from police to the community and, in challenging times, serve as repairers of the breach.The PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.6 months
Community/Police shared engagement in spiritualityThe PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.6 months
Provide as full an amount of information on internal police complaints and discipline as current law allows. At present, the data presented in the Annual Reports are skeletal and provide too little information for a member of the public to determine whether or not officers are being held accountable for actions that violate policy or lawosed, by type of misconduct.  Report broken out by type of misconduct, the number of findings of exonerated, not resolved, sustained, or unfounded, disciplinary actions recommended, by which agency and by type of misconduct, and disciplinary actions imposed, by type of misconduct. For individual disciplinary complaints, the report must include, for each, a short narrative of the conduct alleged, the finding made by the investigating agency, if the disciplinary complaint is sustained, the disciplinary action recommended, and the disciplinary action actually imposed. There should also be a report that includes the number of incidents of officers terminated and permitted to return to duty with back pay.PBP has purchased IA Pro software, which provides data reports, charts, and graphs of the information requested, as well as synopses of the complaints. This information can easily be added/provided to a front-facing dashboard. A discipline tracker is currently compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This too can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.Provide a front-facing dashboard with the requested information. Implement the IA Pro software and the Discipline Tracker and provide the information to a front-facing dashboard. This front facing dashboard would look to incorporate complaint information from the Office of Municipal Investigations and the Citizens Police Review Board.16 months
The PBP shall identify a partner for the construction of internal and public facing data platforms and dashboards to allow both PBP personnel at all levels and the public to understand and PBP activities, in as close to real time as is possible.   This must include, at a minimum, an easily used public dashboard on routine enforcement activities that have shown racial disparities in the past, in order to monitor progress on improving these outcomes.Crime Analysis has met with multiple parters to discuss creation of public dashboards, including Pittsburgh I&P, the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center [WPRDC], as well as upcoming meetings with the mayor's office. Potential hosting platforms (ESRI, Power BI, new RMS) are being examined for feasibility. Complexity of some police data structure is a complicating factor, that will be impacted by new RMS.Select the approprate partner and construct the public facing data platform.1 Year
Officer Wellness
Increase communication and partnership between PBP and the City of Pittsburgh’s Department of Human Resources in order to more effectively serve public safety officers, employees and their families.The PBP has implemented a full-time Wellness Coordinator position which meets this requirement. This wellness coordinator will prioritize officer safety and wellness by implementing programs to improve and support both the physical as well as the mental health of our officers. Complete
Increase communication and partnership between leadership of Pittsburgh Bureau of Police and the City’s Department of Human Resources. The wellness coordinator has a strong working relationship with personel in HR.Complete
Consider a specific partnership between PBP Wellness Coordinator and assigned staff member in the HR Office.The wellness Coordinator has a strong working relationship with personel in HR.PBP established the Pittsburgh Member Assistance Program (PMAP). Extending this program to Officers families will be discussed with the Wellness Coordinator.3 months
Examine the creation of a police-specific Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to focus on the particular needs of police and their families.The PBP implemented Pittsburgh Membership Assistance Program (PMAP) in October 2015, which meets this requirement.Complete
Study the current providers of therapy and counseling services through the EAP.  If therapists who are specially trained to deal with the issues facing those in the first responder community – including police, firefighters, and EMS – are available, consider the implementation of an independent group of private therapists who are contracted through the PBP and provide services to officers free of charge.  The PBP implemented PMAP in October 2015, which provides access to this service and specialized providers to meet this need. Complete
Collaborate with health gurus – either specific health gurus assigned to PBP or a different partnership to alert PBP to all services offered to them and their families.The PBP Wellness Coordinator meets this requirement and has a good working relationship with the health gurus. Complete
Examine the current Officer Wellness Office and consider the ways to bolster these areas of focus: mental and emotional wellness, including the unique toll it takes to serve as a first responder, physical health including controllable health and chronic health issues, alcohol or substance abuse,  financial stability,  marital and familial issues, including care of family/parents and spiritual wellness.  The PBP Wellness Coordinator has revamped the position to focus on the recommended areas, as well as ensure that they are working within the scope of best practices and guidelines.Complete
Consider the creation of a Public Safety/First Responders Resiliency Center to provide a “one-stop shop” for first responders (police, firefighters, and emergency medical technicians) and their families where they can receive support in all areas of wellness: physical fitness, nutrition, psychological counseling (both individual and group), physical therapy, financial education, and other large group meetings.  Such a center would help with retention of personnel, fewer physical injuries, and most importantly, a reduction in disciplinary issues by ensuring that first responders are mentally and physically fit.Members of PMAP have been working on a proposal for a creation of a “Resiliency Center” as a “one-stop shop” with Sgt. Kearns spearheading this endeavor. More work is needed to identify a location and costs associated with creating the center.1 year
Training programs to institute a Culture of Wellness. This begins in the academy and needs to be mandatory on a regular schedule throughout an officer’s tenure in PBP.The PBP Wellness Coordinator meets this requirement. The PBP Training Academy also includes curriculum involving officer wellness and health (both physical and mental) during both initial entry and annual trainings.Complete
Due to unique stresses police officers experience and the stigmas often associated with seeking help, it is recommended that Pittsburgh Public Safety engage an existing provider of officer wellness mobile apps to customize a mobile app for all Pittsburgh public safety officers, civilian employees and their families (as needed).  The app should be customized specific to the City Pittsburgh needs, combining the best available local and national resources that are tailored for law enforcement, firefighters, dispatchers, and other public safety personnel.  The PBP is in the process of exploring Cordico, a wellness app that meets this requirement.Identify funding stream and implement the Cordico Mobile app program.6 months
Recruitment strategies for the Police Academy infused by spiritualityThe Department of Human Resources and Civil Service will incorporate police recruitment strategies inspired by the guardian mindset. The department will work with the PBP to produce recruitment information and materials (brochures, videos, etc) that focus on the benefits of serving the public, protecting citizens, and connecting with the community. 1 Year
Training of cadets in an understanding of the importance of spiritualityThe PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.1 year
On-going professional development of members of the PBP in broadening their awareness of spirituality The PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.1 year
Serve as a counsel to police as they develop anti-racist/multi-cultural education of cadets, professional development of officers, and police policiesA vendor for cross-cultural training has been selected.Vendor working to create curriculum; focus groups with police, community, and community leaders in works.1 year
Identify exemplary models (local and national) of spiritual leaders, police, and community   partnerships for adaptation across neighborhoods and police zones.  PBP CEO in conversations with leadership at police departments such as Phoenix and Philadelphia to identify best practices.1 year
Deployment of spiritual leaders at times of need to help de-escalate tensions between police and community.The PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.1 year
Enhance PBP Chaplain Program to work in concert with an identified and dedicated team of local interfaith spiritual leaders educated in the impact of spirituality on de-escalation, police wellness and community policing.The PBP CEO is currently working with community spiritual leaders to meet this goal.1 year
Reimagining Policing
Reimagining policing builds upon existing community structures that are currently under-resourced and incorporating new models.
Recommendations prioritize building or strengthening structures and other service sources to handle the categories that are not related to fighting and responding to serious crime, with the goal of moving as many of these other responsibilities to others within two years. The Office of Community Health and Safety was launched in January to build a continuum of supports and responses to non-violent offenses. OCHS, in partnership with PBP and Pittsburgh EMS, launched a co-response and proactive homelessness street outreach team with Allegheny Health Network in Q4 of 2020. OCHS is working with PBP and Foundation of HOPE to develop pre-charge diversion pilot in Zone 1 with plans to scale across the city.PBP and OCHS are revising/rebuilding CIT training for officers and fortifying partnerships with programs like re:solve to ensure most appropriate response and officer preparedness. Over the next year, OCHS will pilot alternative response models with community and public safety input to prioritize and scale safe "right responder" models.2 years
Ensure that appropriate training for 911 triage is implemented. Given such services are operated at the County level.Continuing a partnership with the Allegheny County Emergency Management Agency Office with the newly created Office of Community Health &Safety and Crisis Response Working Group.On-going
The City of Pittsburgh should serve as a leader to advocate for these changes, aiming to garner support from other municipalities in Allegheny County. OCHS is working with PBP, CONNECT (Congress of Neighboring Communities), Allegheny County Sheriffs, and Allegheny County Department of Human Services Crisis Response group to develop county-wide jurisdictionally equitable programming, including pre-charge diversion, CIT training for borough officers, and proactive homelessness outreach.
The City of Pittsburgh leadership convene other law enforcement agencies around these principles to ensure social justice efforts are consistent within the city. The PBP conducted a meeting with Allegheny County Law Enforcement partners on April 12, 2020 and shared the PBP's vision for 21st Century Policing.PBP to convene regular meetings with local police agenices operating within the City of Pittsburgh to discuss social justice reform.On-going
PBP structures the Memorandum of Agreement with Pittsburgh Public Schools (PPS) to remove over-policing in PPS and develop a pre-arrest diversion program.The PBP participates in a youth diversion project with the Foundation of Hope (FOH) piloting in Zone 1.FOH seeks to expand this pilot project city wide. Currently PPS has their own Police Agency for enforcing laws within PPS schools.1 year
Increase the share of encounter-free traffic enforcement among non-criminal incidents. Encounter free traffic enforcement reduces direct police interaction with drivers and passengers for routine traffic stops not-related to criminal activity. The PBP is currently exploring alternative forms of traffic enforcement which could remove bias while balancing public safety.1 year
Reset priorities for Pittsburgh policing.Engaging a consultant to assist PBP leadership in defining priorities and further developing a strategic plan.PBP Leadership is working to determine the current priorities, and what the new priorities of the PBP should be with input from governement, community, external, and internal stakeholders.6 months
Increase data collection and reporting for greater transparency with the public on disposition of nonviolent incidents, and data-informed policy decisions. The PBP currently collects data regarding non-violent incidents and interactions. This data is published yearly in the annual report. With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements. The Office of Community Health and Safety to examine existing calls to determine an improved response model.1 year
Implement a data-informed approach to reset policing priorities and shift appropriate activities to other entities. Use existing data sources to produce a public breakdown of how officer time is spent in responses to: serious crimes, burglar alarms (including false alarms), taking reports, traffic enforcement, checks on citizen welfare, truancy, noise complaints, etc..With the implementation of the new Records Management System, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.Office of Community Health and Safety to examine existing calls to determine an improved response model.1 year
Provide intersectional data (race, gender identity, disability, etc.) on 911 call disposition and response and police-initiated stops for the continuum – initiation to arrest.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Meet the need to create a safe, equitable, and just community through improved PBP-community relations.The PBP has established the Community Engagement Office (CEO) to meet this need.Complete
Implement crisis intervention efforts to provide a non-police response or hybrid response for non-criminal incidents centered on human service needs. Examples of models as previously discussed include but are not limited to CAHOOTS and STAR.  The PBP works with Mercy Behavioral Health and UPMC for the Crisis Intervention Team, as well as Re:Solve as a community outreach program for non-criminal incidents. Additionally, PBP, EMS, OCHS launched the AHN street outreach and co-reponse team in 2020 to proactively support individuals experiencing issues related to homelessness/displacement and to co-respond with first responders.PBP and OCHS working to scale AHN integrated teams across the city. are revising/rebuilding CIT training for officers and fortifying partnerships with programs like re:solve to ensure most appropriate response and officer preparedness. Over the next year, OCHS will pilot alternative response models with community and public safety input to prioritize and scale safe "right responder" models. Additionally, OCHS is developng neighborhood health and safety trainings in partnership with PBP, PBF, and EMS to empower community members to navigate systems and provide appropriate bystander care.2 years
Shift some traffic enforcement duties away from PBP.  Models to explore that include use of technology: Encounter-free traffic stops, such as Friedersdorf’s (2016) recommendation to replace police direct engagement in routine traffic stops of vehicles that exhibit a violation with taking a photo of the license plate and mailing a “fix it” ticket. Berkeley, CA – City Council voted to shift traffic and parking enforcement from the police bureau to a newly created Department of TransportationThe PBP is currently exploring alternative forms of traffic enforcement which could remove bias while balancing public safety. OCHS is partnering with social service supports. Additionally the PBP and City of Pittsburgh are exploring legislative actions needed to make changes to current enforcement models. 1 year
Reallocate PBP funding to more appropriately align human services functions currently handled by PBPCity council reallocated money to prioritize prevention, intervention and reintegration in an effort to reimagine Public Safety. The reallolcation of funds will suppot work being done by the Office of Community Health and Safety and the Office of Community Services and Violence Prevention.On-going
Provide PBP with resources and support to effectively respond to non-criminal human service calls/needs.The PBP works with Mercy Behavioral Health and UPMC for the Crisis Intervention Team, as well as Re:Solve as a community outreach program for non-criminal incidents. PBP and OCHS working to scale AHN integrated teams across the city. are revising/rebuilding CIT training for officers and fortifying partnerships with programs like re:solve to ensure most appropriate response and officer preparedness. Over the next year, OCHS will pilot alternative response models with community and public safety input to prioritize and scale safe "right responder" models. Additionally, OCHS is developng neighborhood health and safety trainings in partnership with PBP, PBF, and EMS to empower community members to navigate systems and provide appropriate bystander care.On-going
Allocate funding from the Public Safety budget to support non-law enforcement crisis intervention partners for above recommendations. Examples include, but are not limited to community outreach, mental health interventions, school and out-of-school time activities, etc.).Internal meetings have been scheduled to discuss funding, identifiy partners and create appropriate timelines.On-going
Reallocate funding from the PBP budget to reduce non-criminal incidents that escalate to Immigration and Customs Enforcement involvement.The PBP does not engage in investigatory detention of individuals based on their immigration status. PBP Policy states that "Officers shall not inquire as to a victim’s/witness’s immigration status. Officers must protect crime victims regardless of their immigration status, and should encourage all victims and witnesses to report crimes, regardless of their immigration status. Members shall not arrest or detain any individual based on a civil immigration warrant and any administrative warrants listed in the National Crime Information Center Database (NCIC) "Complete
Reallocate PBP funding previously earmarked for activities prohibited through the Use of Force subcommittee recommendations to implement recommendations provided in this report.Reallocation of funds will support the work of the Office of Community Services and Violence Prevention. On-going
Work through existing programs and developing new services to respond to nonviolent incidents.The Office of Community Health and Safety was launched in January to build a continuum of supports and responses to non-violent offenses. OCHS, in partnership with PBP and Pittsburgh EMS, launched a co-response and proactive homelessness street outreach team with Allegheny Health Network in Q4 of 2020. OCHS is working with PBP and Foundation of HOPE to develop pre-charge diversion in Zone 1 with plans to scale across the city.PBP and OCHS working to scale AHN integrated teams across the city. are revising/rebuilding CIT training for officers and fortifying partnerships with programs like re:solve to ensure most appropriate response and officer preparedness. Over the next year, OCHS will pilot alternative response models with community and public safety input to prioritize and scale safe "right responder" models. Additionally, OCHS is developing neighborhood health and safety trainings in partnership with PBP, PBF, and EMS to empower community members to navigate systems and provide appropriate bystander care.
Immediately join and provide ongoing staffing resources for Allegheny County’s Crisis Response Stakeholder Group (CRSG)PBP, Department of Public Safety, Mayor's Office, and Office of Community Health & Safety participated in the entirety of the CRSG and will remain consistently engaged.Complete
Immediately coordinate and collaborate with the Allegheny County government for 911 training to align with CRSG objectives.In progress by Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, Pittsburgh Public Safety Department, and Office of Community Health & Safety.Attend regular meetings.On-going
Reduce PBP responses to noncriminal complaints by increasing education and outreach around the appropriate “n11” to contact. 211 is a comprehensive 24/7 multi-modal resource for human service needs.  311 is for non-emergency municipal services.Officers will continue to publicize and explain the "211 & 311" systems at community meetings. CEO working to create Public Service Announcements to educate community on "211 & 311" options. OCHS will also provide support. 1 year
Adopt Allegheny County Department of Human Services Pre-arrest Diversion Model -  Partner with police, community and system stakeholders on pre-arrest diversion efforts that provide opportunities for law enforcement to connect people who have underlying needs to community-based supports in lieu of arrest (e.g. LEAD).The Office of Community Health and Safety and PBP are working in direct partnership with DHS and CONNECT to launch pre-charge diversion in Zone 1 with plans to scale across the city.OCHS is developing a plan to scale across the city.1 Year
Reduce the policing and criminalization of communities of colorEntering into a partnership with the Institute of Politics to discuss disproportinate minority contact. Strategy will be developed based on the report.12 months
Budget allocations to support community-led and driven violence prevention, intervention, and interruption initiatives in partnership with law enforcement to create viable public safety alternatives.The PBP currently staffs and funds the Outreach Office, led by Cornell Jones. This meets this requirement.Complete
Conduct 6-month and 12-month evaluation of the effectiveness of the newly created Office of Community Health and Safety.The new office will look at call types to better understand how to respond to mental health calls. Similar for homeless services and other vulnerable populations.On-going
Implement specific policies aimed at de-escalationThe PBP has issued General Order 12-6 Use of Force, which requires de-escalation techniques. Policy was revised on January 5, 2021.Complete
Review and strengthen PBP definitions of and training on de-escalation for the purpose of improving the de-escalation techniques and approaches used by PBP going forward in their training academies for cadets, and provided in the ongoing professional development of all officers.The PBP Training Academy has developed a curriculum and teaches de-escalation techniques to all recruit classes.The PBP Training Academy has been working on, and will be providing additional de-escalation training bureau-wide this year.1 Year
Increase investments in efforts that reduce community-level socioeconomic disparities (e.g. transportation, workforce development, affordable housing).The Office of Community Health and Safety will not be directly responsible for the allocation of funding, but will identify the priority areas and make recommendations based on data. The Office of Equity, URA, and Mayor's Office will drive investment strategy with community.
PBP and Pittsburgh Public Schools (PPS) to ratify memorandum of understanding (MOU) within three months. Structure the MOU between PBP and PPS to reduce over-policing in PPS.Revise and update the current MOU between the PBP and PPS.
Remove the seven discretionary offenses from Section IIA of the MOU to allow schools the discretion to determine the appropriate resolution.Revise and update the current MOU between the PBP and PPS.
PPS will not issue summary citations to youth until issues around disproportionality can be addressed and clear guidelines can be established around if/when to issue summary citations to youth.PPS and the City of Pittsburgh are separate entities. PPS has its own police force to enforce state and local crimes.
Implement a pre-arrest diversion programThe PBP participates in a Youth Diversion Pilot in Zone 1.PBP is evaluating ways to scale youth diversion across the city. The Office of Community Health and Safety and PBP are working in direct partnership with DHS and CONNECT to launch pre-charge diversion in Zone 1 with plans to scale across the city.6 months
Advocate for and coordinate with a County Police Review Board.The PBP has had a Citizens Police Review Board for decades and is willing to work with Allegheny County as a model for this systemComplete
Recruitment, Training, Education and Hiring
Recruitment
Reform hiring practices to ensure that law enforcement better reflects our Pittsburgh community in terms of culture, race and gender, and includes an extensive psychological assessment aimed at weeding out persons with aggressive personalities. These practices should include the examination of the ‘secondary qualifiers’, including the reading test, physical fitness test, polygraph examination, and research to discern the reasons for the gap between white, black and candidates of color. The hiring practices should also include conducting a full background check into the applicant’s former police job history: disciplinary action, complaints, and reasons for separation. These records should be maintained for a period of thirty (30) years, if not permanently. The City’s recruitment efforts should be continually assessed to measure their effectiveness.PBP, Public Safety, HRCS, and Mayor's Office to review recruitment, qualifications, and hiring practices for prospectives officers.
Offer carefully selected and trained mentors to help retain all officers, particularly new female and minority officers, through their early careers.    ‘Recruitment Coaches’ who are identified could help navigate cadet candidates through the secondary qualifiers.  These individuals could come from members of the community who have a commitment to having a more diverse police force, including former and retired police officers, who have a vested interest in developing a guardian mindset in police candidates, and who are committed to getting these individuals through the process to reach the end goal of becoming a Pittsburgh police officer.  Existing officers, particularly those who have lived in the community for a number of years, should be encouraged to recruit and recommend candidates for the Police Academy.The National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives(N.O.B.L.E.) has developed a program at California University that mentors individuals interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement. This NOBLE Collegiate Chapter is planning on partnering with the PBP to include mentoring, shadowing, and internships. The Police Ambassador Program, is a paid program that focuses on 5 key points (Diversity, Community Relations, Leadership Development, Mentorship, and Meaningful Experience). The goal of each of these programs is to help motivate and support individuals through the hiring process of becoming a Police Officer.1 year
Recruit officers who display a "guardian mindset" in their approach to community policing. As President Obama's Taskforce on 21st Century Policing noted: “Law enforcement cannot build community trust if it is seen as an occupying force coming in from outside to rule and control the community. As Plato wrote, 'In a republic that honors the core of democracy—the greatest amount of power is given to those called Guardians. Only those with the most impeccable character are chosen to bear the responsibility of protecting the democracy.” This guardian approach should be reinforced through ongoing training throughout an officer's career.The PBP has adopted the guardian mindset and is working to develop and facilitate training to establish congruent mindset training for Officers that further develops proper response actions based on when each mindset model and when each mindset is necessary and appropriate.The PBP is working to establish training criteria to further develop the guardian mindset congruent with 21st century policing models, while ensuring Officer and citizen safety, and establishing evolving state of the art police practices and procedures.1 year
Expanding the PA Confidence in Law Enforcement Act to require termination for misconduct that is other than a felony. This would require legislative amendmentsChanges to the PA Confidence in Law Enforcement Act would require State / legislative advocacy / action.
Adopt and implement the Citizen Police Review Board (CPRB) recommendations contained in the in-depth redacted version accepted by the Recruitment subcommittee, (CPRB) Recommendations, and consider adopting the opinion of the Ongoing Training & Professional Development - Full Recommendations from the Recruitment, Hiring, Training, Education Subcommittee CPRB whose research indicates that the 60 college credit requirement does not adversely affect the recruitment of women or minorities, and should be retained to help increase the professionalism of the force. There must be extraordinary and innovative efforts to significantly increase the percentage of blacks and women on the Pittsburgh police force, such as devising a strong marketing campaign, supporting participation in the Civilian Police Academy, the Student Police Academy, and expanding the criminal justice program in the Pittsburgh Public Schools to attract more African American candidates. To enhance the potential for the recruitment of additional African Americans, all oral panels for the Bureau must include not less than one citizen, and should contain at least one African American.The PBP has implemented a new position for Recruitment at the PBP Training Academy. This position will work to meet these mandates.1 Year
Cadet Training
Seek ways to ensure that new police officers are in it for the good of the community.  This could be done through a thorough interview process with new cadet candidates. The Department of Human Resources and Civil Service will incorporate police recruitment strategies inspired by the guardian mindset. The department will work with the PBP to produce recruitment information and materials (brochures, videos, etc) that focus on the benefits of serving the public, protecting citizens, and connecting with the community. Explore the possibility of including community members into the interview portion of the hiring process.
Adopt the CPRB recommendation that academy training include mental conditioning, stress avoidance and reduction, integration and recognition of stress effects, with the preventative principles of stress management and practical experience. Academy training should be presented by a professional health care practitioner specializing in the psychophysiological processes related to stress conditions, and it should be required annually and applicable to the entire organization.The PBP Training Academy currently provides training in mental conditioning, stress avoidance and reduction, and other related areas.The PBP should seek out and partner with an instructor who is a professional health care practitioner who meets this criteria. The PBP Officer Wellness Office will be expanded to include wellness liaisons in each duty location to provide resources and support concurrent with officer trauma exposure and building a stress resilient work environment. 6 months
Create a culture within PBP that fosters an ongoing commitment to the spirit and meaning of ‘community policing’. This goal would include requiring that officers be trained annually, with ongoing reinforcement in cultural competency, de-escalation and harm-reduction techniques and providing cultural competency training by experts in African American culture as well as those who can represent the interest of other marginalized communities. Additional cultural competency training may also include experts from as the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History; mandating training on racial, religious, and discriminatory profiling for all law enforcement; requiring training of all officers for proper use of body cameras during all calls, which would include requiring body cameras to be left on during any interaction with the public. A police officer that does not adhere to this requirement should receive some level of discipline that is severe enough to help ensure compliance.The PBP Training Academy provides training in community policing, de-escalation and harm reduction, the Inside-Out program, the illegalities of profiling, and body-camera usage and policy. The PBP does discipline officers who fail to use their body cameras within policyThe PBP Training Academy is working to expand the curriculum to meet the remainder of these requirements. Community feedback forums on community training impact are supported to measure the practice of the training in the field.1 year
Train officers to move from exclusively crime fighting to encompass other service-oriented functions and to be trained to recognize the characteristics of individuals in crisis to provide an effective positive resolution to the situation while reducing liability and the risk of injury.  The various types of de-escalation practices suggested by this Recruitment subcommittee should be adopted by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police within the training component of the Police Academy, and for the necessary ongoing training of its officers, if not already contained within the City’s training program. The goal for all officers is to be in command of as many de-escalation techniques as possible which will allow them to be well equipped to secure the scene at hand, to calmly communicate with the citizens involved and to produce positive outcomes. Training must always emphasize that the use of force should never be considered routine and that utmost restraint should always be used, always respecting the sanctity of all human life. Training should also emphasize that all attempts should be made to gain compliance of the subject through less-lethal means.The PBP Training Academy has expanded its curriculum to meet these requirements prior to the reccomendations of this report.Continue to instruct on the curriculum provided by the PBP Training Academy so that Officers receive this training on a regular basis. Recognition and praise for consistant de-escalation efforts as well as character development will be highlighted in organizational communication.Complete
The Police Academy should calibrate its training with the City offices that track the diversity of languages spoken by residents of Pittsburgh. The intent is to provide cadets with a basic multi-cultural awareness to understand languages other than English spoken to police officers. All police officers should carry an annually updated pocket card of the following statement in multiple languages, “I am a police officer. Please follow my visual instructions to make sure that no one gets hurt.  I am here to help you.”PBP Officers have access to a Language Line service that can provide real time, on demand interpretation of any language spoken. PBP maintains a list of active officers that are fluent in non-english languages. PBP has a language card to facilitate the identification of languages spoken by indiviudals during police interactions.PBP Training Academy to explore inservice training for common phrases for languages spoken withing the region.12 months
Train police to understand people’s limits and inabilities to process and understand police commands, particularly people with disabilities, mentally ill, and medical emergencies. This process should include at least yearly refresher courses, including role playing workshops.The PBP Training Academy currently provides the recommended training, however not on a yearly basis. The Training Academy will attempt to incorporate this training into yearly inservice training.Local disability support organizations will be invited to join collaborative learning and practice sessions to reinforce training application1 year
Create policies against participation in discriminatory and hate speech, or supporting such viewpoints publicly or on social media. The taskforce understands that such policies may only pertain to on-duty conduct; however, the PBP can and must periodically review officers’ personal or off-duty speech, particularly on social media. This review can help the PBP identify any conduct that may affect officers’ on-duty performance. Once identified, the PBP can monitor officer interactions, up to and including arrests, so that it may intervene appropriately when it determines that conduct approaches or becomes harassment, discriminatory, or excessive in the use of force. The PBP has issued policy 68-03 which meets these requirements. Officers on-duty performance is reviewed based on violations of policy 68-03Complete
Create a policy that requires police body cams, and police car videos be activated immediately when interacting with people as a result of a police call or suspected necessary police intervention, as well enacting policies which mandate that police report other police who violate police policies. These policies and procedures must be shared, in depth, during the initial training of new police cadets, and must be reinforced on at least an annual basis, if not an ongoing basis. The PBP must be consistent in its issuance of discipline for violations of this policy.The PBP has policies which covers this mandate and meets many of the requirments. These policies are General Orders 69-01 and 69-03. 69-01 is available via this link.Both General Order 69-01 and 69-03 are under review. 69-03 is available via this link.Complete
Commit to have new cadets and all members of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police complete the Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Gender Expression (SOGIE) training.  There should be a ‘refresher’ course provided to all officers on an annual basis. Training should include sensitizing officers on how to most appropriately interact with people who are, or who are perceived to be, LGBTQIA+, and training which includes the most effective ways to counter attitudes that a police officer may already possess when encountering people who they may already view in a very negative fashion. The PBP must be consistent in its issuance of discipline for discriminatory behavior based on gender identity or expression.The PBP Training Academy currently provides the recommended training to recruits.The Training Academy will attempt to incorporate this into annual inservice training.1 year
Community Engagement
Expand the Youth Connections initiative developed within the last five years, and create more community-based opportunities with such groups as the YMCA, YWCA, grass roots organizations, religious institutions, and the Pittsburgh Public Schools, where coursework on and for policing can be made more accessible to the public. Steps should be taken to actively expand the already existing community interactions through such programs as Big Brother/Big Sister programs, Cops and Hoops, and the Police Athletic League (PAL).PBP applied for grant funding to expand this program. Once the funding is confirmed, all PBP officers will be considered for participation with broader youth oriented activities and commitments.1 year
Train police officers in their informal interactions with community members to build more positive ongoing relationships between neighborhood residents and the police. Officers should be instructed on better interactions with citizens as they begin to walk their neighborhoods to build nurturing and healthy relationships.  Organize programs which bring new officers and community leaders together in a ‘meet and greet’ program, to encourage the officers to accept that leaders frequently know what is best for their community, and/or how they can best  work together for the benefit of all.“Community Policing” should be used as the philosophy for daily operations of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police. Training should encourage every officer to be community minded, compassionate and empathetic.  Community engagement can include career fairs at which HR and police representatives will interact with adults about career opportunities, while other public safety staff interact with the youth through the use of McGruff the Dog, police cars, fire trucks, and ambulances, etc.The PBP has implemented these recomendations. This begins in the Training Academy with training on Community Oriented Policing. It has expanded to include "meet-and-greet" sessions for new officers in several Zones. The Community Engagement Office is focused on following through with many of these projects.Complete
City should employ a full time liaison who will work with the community and the police to create and promote positive relationships.The City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Public Safety has created the Office of Community Health and Safety within the Bureau of Public Safety. The PBP has also created the Community Engagement Office staffed with full-time Officers to meet this recommendation.Complete
Produce an annual public operational profile, which describes internal and external outcomes of the PBP. This document should profile the nature, outcomes and number of disciplinary actions taken, disciplinary grievances and arbitration, demotions and separations, commendations and promotions, and the educational levels of active officers. It should also indicate the number of calls responded to the incidence of officers’ use of force, arrests and conviction rates. This document of transparency would serve to influence public confidence, as well as offer prospective applicants information to evaluate personal career choices within the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police. The PBP Currently issues an Annual Report. Further information can be included in the PBP Annual Report to meet this recommendation. A discipline tracker is currently being compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.1 year
Relations with the Fraternal Order of Police
Increased diversity in the selection of arbitrators to include people of various ages, more women and more people of colorThe City of Pittsburgh and FOP currently utilize the National Association of Arbitrators when selecting an arbitrator. This association has a selection process in place that allows input and objections from both parties to maintain fairness during selection. Changes would require State / legislative advocacy / action.
The Municipal Police Officers Education and Training Commission (MPOETC) is the licensing body of PBP officers, and it sets standards for licensing police officers. It should exercise its authority to revoke licenses for certain types of misconduct more frequently. Also, diversification of the commission will be important for that as its members are largely members of law enforcement, and it includes only one member of the public at large. This would require legislative amendments to PA Act 120The PBP has a good working relationship with MPOETC. The department maintains open and frequent communication with MPOETC when an officer is charged or potentially being charged with a criminal offense. Changes regarding MPOETC would require State / legislative advocacy / action.
PA Act 111 needs to include a public policy exception to enforcement of arbitration awards, so that an arbitration award could be vacated if it is against public policy. This would require legislative amendments; and, Changes to Act 111 would require State / legislative advocacy / action.
There needs to be consistency in the schedule of discipline for policy violations so that disciplinary grievances are not based on disparate treatment.A discipline tracker is currently being compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.1 Year
Transparency and Accountability
Implement an Office/Director of Data Analytics and Policy or accomplish through a contractual arrangement, to collect, evaluate and use data to drive policy and practice to build community trust, fair policing and to reduce disparate treatment of racial minorities, people with disabilities, members of the LGBTQIA+ community and youth.  With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Data should be publicly available and consumable via easy to use dashboards that are regularly updated (if not updated in real time).With the implementation of the new Records Management System, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Data should include the number of encounters with community members of minority and marginalized groups, including people with disabilities, type of disabilities, types of encounters/citations. Data should also include specific  ?contacts between police and communities of color, LGBTQIA+ people, and other intersections among these marginalized groups.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Data should also include numbers of negative outcomes, including disaggregated data to assess how police interact with minority communities noted above.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Data collection needs to have percentages, graphs, and summaries to identify gaps in the system, where the bridge of communication is faltering in the community/police engagement, and if more resources can be identified and funding for such resources can be achieved.With the implementation of the new RMS, reports can be added, generated, and manipulated as needed to meet these and any further requirements.1 year
Implement an officer bystander intervention program like EPIC to build a culture of zero tolerance for inappropriate use of force.The PBP Training Academy is researching the implementation of such a program.1 Year
Some members of the community do not understand and/or trust the functioning of the Office of Municipal Investigations and the Citizen Police Review Boards.  It is recommended that both offices take steps to establish a stronger connection to the public to explain how they operate and to translate data about why so few complaints regarding officer misconduct are sustained. This may be achieved by adding one or more community liaison to the Citizen Police Review Board and by extending the authority of the CPRB to investigate complaints.In the summer of 2019, OMI hired an intern to update our printed material and write a script for an OMI infomercial. OMI has worked with HR and Special Events to attend and table at community events and job fairs. Staff is available to provide printed materials describing our purpose, process and how we differ from the CPRB. In 2019, OMI attended 7 events (Hill District, Brighton Heights, Point Breeze, etc.) OMI staff routinely presents at both the Civic Leadership Academy and Citizen Police Academy.OMI's printed materials are updated and available.  The infomercial has been filmed, but needs final edits before being added to City Channel. OMI will continue to attend community events once in person events begin, post-pandemic. CLA and CPA have continued virtually.2nd Qtr 2021
The new Office of Community Health and Safety may play a role in developing more transparency regarding complaints against the PBP, particularly now that this Office has oversight of the policing of protests.This recommendation is outside the direct scope of OCHS. This is currently being handled by the CPRB and OMI. The OCHS will be responsible for identifying and developing partnerships and internal response continuum.
Provide the community with more and better explanations around why the majority of complaints against officers are unfounded, not resolved and exonerated.PBP has purchased IA Pro software, which provides data reports, charts, and graphs of the information requested, as well as a synopsis of the complaints. This information can easily be added/provided to a front-facing dashboard. A discipline tracker is currently compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This too can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.Provide a front-facing dashboard with the requested information. Implement the IA Pro software and the discipline tracker and provide the information to a front-facing dashboard.6 months
Expand the PBP's single page version (in the 2019 Annual Report) of reporting on "Officer Disciplinary Actions" to include data as well as narratives that allow citizens to understand how big of a pool of complaints these sparse data come from (i.e. 97 out of how many?), what happened in any individual case (via narratives), and the like.PBP has purchased IA Pro software, which provides data reports, charts, and graphs of the information requested, as well as a synopsis of the complaints. This information can easily be added/provided to a front-facing dashboard. A discipline tracker is currently compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This too can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.Provide a front-facing dashboard with the requested information. Implement the IA Pro software and the discipline tracker and provide the information to a front-facing dashboard.6 months
Reduce the number of officers who have been charged with or exhibit consistent patterns of misconduct who return to PBP.The PBP has a disciplinary process in place per the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. This process involves all parties presenting to a neutral abitrator.
Expand, revitalize, and fully implement use of the Personnel Assessment and Review System (PARS), or replace PARS with another early warning system, either alternative to meet current state of the art and best practice standards.  Early warning systems assist police agencies in identifying potentially problematic police officers and behaviors and focus the agency on finding remedies (counseling, re-training, etc.) before these problems cause damage to the public and/or the agency.PBP has purchased IA Pro software, which provides data reports, charts, and graphs of the information requested, as well as a synopsis of the complaints. Part of the IA Pro software package is EI Pro, which is an early warning system that is superior to the PARS system.Implement technology that reduces the amount of time supervisors spend in redundant bureaucratic tasks to allow for more time spend where the supervisor is most significantly impactful - on the street in the communities with the officers. 6 months
Advocate for and negotiate changes to the PBP contract or state or local law to allow for removal of officers who have demonstrated patterns of misconduct, particularly (though not only) improper use of force.The PBP has a disciplinary process in place per the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. This process involves all parties presenting to a neutral abitrator.
Exploring every available avenue and proposal to reinforce the City and the PBP’s abilities to discipline, including demonstrating conduct that violates the public trust. The collective bargaining agreement must allow the arbitrator to determine whether reinstatement of a terminated officer would violate public policy.The PBP has a disciplinary process in place per the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. This process involves all parties presenting to a neutral abitrator.
The community cannot establish trust with the police department without positive interactions and better mutual understanding of their work. To help build community trust, the PBP should implement forums or community meetings at which PBP can present information and hear citizen concerns and suggestions.  Simply publishing an annual report is not enough. These community forums should especially seek to engage racial minorities, people with disabilities, immigrant communities, youth, and members of the LGBTQIA+ community as well as leaders in these historically marginalized communities.The City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Public Safety has created the Office of Community Health and Safety within the Bureau of Public Safety. The PBP has also created the CEO staffed with full-time Officers who can work to meet this recomendation.6 months
It is the culture of any organization that largely determines its direction, its internal ethics, and its interactions with the people that it serves.  This is the case as much with police agencies as any other kind of organization, and the PBP is no exception.  The taskforce believes that the internal culture of the PBP is just as important as any set of rules or policies PBP officers must follow, if not more so.  In that spirit, the taskforce recommends the following efforts.
The PBP must reject the Warrior culture of policing, prominent in many police organizations, and fully embrace the Guardian policing mindset in order to build trust and legitimacy with the public. Mayor Peduto recommended this shift in his opening remarks charging the taskforce at its first meeting, and we agree that this should be a high priority.   Warrior policing is characterized by choosing their own side, dehumanizing others as enemies, and acting on instinct. Guardian policing, by contrast, chooses the law, sees people as distinct individuals, and acts in deliberate, thoughtful fashion whenever possible. A pledge to keep procedural justice at the center of policy, training and action throughout the PBP will go a long way toward the Guardian mindset; the first-rank procedural justice training that PBP officers have received should be continued and reinforcedThe PBP has adopted the guardian mindset and is working to develop and facilitate training to establish congruent mindset training for Officers that further develops proper response actions based on when each mindset model and when each mindset is necessary and appropriate. Education on warrior minset and proper application, while eliminating the culture of the police at war with its citizens, is the driving force to cultural change and police mindset training methodologies in order to promote the proper mindset response to emerging situations.The PBP is working to establish training criteria to further develop the guardian mindset congruent with 21st century policing models, while ensuring Officer and citizen safety, and establishing evolving state of the art police practices and procedures. Develop taskforce groups to address emerging criminal activity with a comprehensive strategic approach that include eliminating the criminal element while engaging the community as partners in the on going mission to deliver justice and promote a safe community. This methodology will take both strategic vision by command, implementation through training and eduction, along with supervison to ensure the objectives of the executive management strategy. The development and implementation of this executive managment strategy will take the engagement of the community, robust and active participation by command for he success of this particular reform.1 year
Racial reconciliation efforts, begun in late 2018, must be re-energized, reconstituted, and be brought front and center for the PBP.  Racial reconciliation was one of the three main pillars of the National Initiative to Create Community Trust and Justice.  Pittsburgh was one of the six pilot sites for the National Initiative, and the PBP began its efforts on this pillar with a large event at the Heinz History Center on November 13, 2018.  A small number of follow up events followed.  These efforts must be renewed with a new vigor.  Successful police change requires beginning with a full acknowledgment of the role of police in racial injustices past and present.  While many current officers have had no role in present injustices, and none in the mistakes of the past in which police were the enforcement arm for vile laws and customs, they wear the same patch and uniform of the enforcers of those laws and practices.  In order for African Americans and those others subject to these unjust actions to regain and build trust with the PBP, the effort to apologize for and admit prior mistakes must be full throated and sincere.The PBP remains steadfast in our commitment to the work we started with the National Initiative (NI). Starting with the next recruit class there will be a 4-hour training block on 21st Century Policing, NI overview, and reconciliation added to the curriculum. The PBP is a leader in Procedural Justice training and has collaborated with the Allegheny County Police to teach PJ and Implicit Bias at the Allegheny County Police Academy so all police agencies have access to the class. Finally, The PBP is working with David Harris to develop a class for basic recruits. On-going
The PBP must, at every turn, pledge its intolerance for misconduct by officers, and the public must see and understand that this commitment is and will be carried out.  The taskforce heard from many members of the public that they were aware of incidents of misconduct by PBP officers, in which the officers were not disciplined or terminated.  No member of the taskforce believes that every incident of misconduct is a firing offense or should result in criminal charges. But the public has no way at this point to know what happens to these incidents or why when they are the subject of complaints, and also sees plainly that some well-known and seemingly blatant incidents of misconduct go unaddressed. The failure to communicate enough information about misconduct and resulting discipline, and the failure to impose discipline that even approaches what is appropriate, damages public trust and confidence of the public in the police.PBP has purchased IA Pro software, which provides data reports, charts, and graphs of the information requested, as well as a synopsis of the complaints. This information can easily be added/provided to a front-facing dashboard. A discipline tracker is currently compiled, and is becoming a part of the PBP internal processes. This too can be provided in a front-facing dashboard.Provide a front-facing dashboard with the requested information. Implement the IA Pro software and the Discipline Tracker and provide the information to a front-facing dashboard.6 months
Use of Force Changes Needed to Pittsburgh Bureau of Police Policy
Four overarching general principles should appear clearly and directly in PBP Use of Force policy, even if current language might imply the same ideas.  Ensure the four general principles are incorporated intol policy as listed below.
1. The sanctity of every human life must be at the heart of everything the PBP does.The PBP operates on the Priority of Life Complete
2. Use of force, especially deadly force, should be a last resort when other alternatives are exhausted, making it both reasonable and necessary.  The PBP's current policy (12-06) regarding use of force , specifically deadly force, currently follows such guidlines. The PBP restricts the use of deadly force to circumstances permitted under state and federal law. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
3. PBP Use of Force policy must include a duty to request medical aid immediately when force has been used and injury results and to provide first aid immediately if they are trained to do so.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
4. Force, deadly or non-deadly, can only be used to accomplish specific law enforcement objectives.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
PBP policy must ban all chokeholds and neck restraints, as now required by the Pittsburgh City Council’s new legislation.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
All uses of force must be proportional.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
De-escalation must be attempted before force can be used, unless doing so would be futile or endanger the officer or other people.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.It is taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
De-escalation is based on effective communication that takes account of the full context and circumstances.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.It is taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
Before shooting or any use of deadly force, officers must warn the suspect unless doing so would increase the risk to the officer, the suspect, or any others.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.It is taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
PBP policy must prohibit shooting at a moving vehicle or the people or the inside the vehicle, unless someone in the vehicle is using or threatening deadly force by means other than the vehicle itself.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.It is taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
PBP policy must require officers to intervene to stop another officer from using excessive force.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.It is taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
PBP policy must require reporting of all use of force, including threats using firearms.This is contained within PBP Policy 12-6, and taught at the PBP Training AcademyComplete
Narrow the justification for use of deadly force in PBP policy section 5.0. 
Amend section 5.1.1 to read, “The action is immediately necessary for the defense of human life…”  Amend sections 5.1.1 and 5.1.1.2 to read that “In order to use deadly force, that action must be not only reasonable but necessary a) to defend against an imminent threat of death or serious bodily harm against the officer or another person; or b) to apprehend a fleeing person for any felony that threatened or resulted in death or serious bodily injury, if the officer reasonably believes that the person will cause death or serious bodily injury to another unless immediately apprehended.  The current core of the PBP’s use of force policy (see Section 5 of that policy) follows current Pennsylvania and U.S. constitutional law very closely.  Those are minimum legal standards that allow more discretion and use of force justifications, and give less protection to citizens from force, than taskforce members believe is wise.  The changes in this recommendation would effectively raise the standard above that Pennsylvania/constitutional minimum; they parallel a use of force law passed in California in 2019The PBP's current policy (12-06) regarding use of force , specifically deadly force, currently follows such guidlines. The PBP restricts the use of deadly force to circumstances permitted under state and federal law.. This policy was revised January 5, 2021.Complete
Prohibit use of deadly force against anyone who poses a danger only to themselves, including those who are sight- or hearing-impaired, otherwise disabled, or suffering from mental illnessOfficers should take into consideration the reason for a person's non-compliance (medical issue, EDP, language barrier), this will be further discussed in 2021 Use of Force training. Just because someone is displaying signs of EDP, mental illness, etc, does not mean an Officer should not use force on said person (depending on the totality of the circumstance) The PBP restricts the use of deadly force to circumstances permitted under state and federal law. The PBP restricts the use of deadly force to circumstances permitted under state and federal law.On-going
Transparency on use of force must be the rule.The PBP is in the process of creating an online dashboard to assist in early detection of use of force issues and to make use of force statistics more accessible to the public. The city has also called on Harrisburg to change state law to create better transparency in regards to use of force. 1 Year
PBP officers must be trained to utilize distance, cover and time to decrease the necessity for the use of force.  To minimize the need for uses of force, especially force that could injure or kill, PBP must develop policy and training mandating the use of physical distance, cover, and time when approaching and managing certain critical incidents, especially incidents involving edged weapons.  When officers can make themselves temporarily safe by maintaining distance and cover from immediate danger, they can buy more time to assess the situation and their options, bring additional resources to the scene, and develop a plan for resolving the incident without the use of force or with only the force necessary to mitigate the threat.The current training provided by the Training Academy meets this standard.Officers are taught to de-escalate situations when it is safe for them to do so (the officer has time, distance, and cover, as well as no 3rd parties are in harm's way). Officer are trained to use de-escalation tools and tactics when they can SAFELY do so.  In addition to use of force training/de-escalation techniques,  the Training Academy puts a lot of emphasis on solid patrol tactics, the crux of this is to teach the officers to recognize when they can slow the action down versus immediate action.Complete
PBP should eliminate from their policies and training all references to the so-called “21-foot rule” regarding officers who are confronted with a subject armed with an edged weapon, if any such references exist, as this standard is unfounded. Instead, officers should be trained to use distance and cover to create a “reaction gap,” or “safe zone,” between themselves and the individual, and to consider all options for responding.The PBP traininig academy does not currently teach the "21 foot rule" but rather emphasizes threat proximity, knowledge of your surroundings and understanding reactionary gaps. Complete
To protect a person with a disability from police use of force, training for police must equip officers to understand a person with a disability limits and issues in understanding and responding to police commands or questions.  When encountering people who officers believe to be disabled or suffering from mental illness, officers will immediately summon a trained professional to assess the situation.Officers should take into consideration the reason for a person's non-compliance (medical issue, EDP, language barrier), this will be further discussed in 2021 Use of Force training. Just because someone is displaying signs of EDP, mental illness, etc, does not mean an officer should not use force on said person (depending on the totality of the circumstance).  The PPB will explore partnering with trained professionals to meet this reccomendation.12 months
Use of Tear Gas, Rubber Bullets, “Flash-bang” Devices and Other Less Lethal Methods of Crowd Control
The use of tear gas, rubber bullets, flash-bang devices, pepper spray, “bean bag” rounds, and other “less-lethal” weapons typically used by the PBP for crowd control must be significantly curtailed and used only in life-threatening situations until such time as the next steps below are carried out and completed.  If the independent organization described below does not formulate viable recommendations and issue a public report within six months of its formation, a moratorium will go into effect on using the PBP tactics described above.  Such moratorium will remain in effect until such time as the independent organization completes its workChief Scott Schubert is co-chair of the Major City Chiefs Association working group on police response to civil unrest.This is currently being investigated by OMI and the CPRB. Most recently a private, independant consultant has been brought in to look further into these events.
The City of Pittsburgh will act to immediately bring in an independent organization, one not affiliated with law enforcement in Western Pennsylvania,  to generate recommendations and a report for the following purpose:This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring6 months
1. Investigating the use of tear gas and all other “less-lethal” weapons in the demonstrations of late May and early June of 2020, as well as the use of kettling (the purpose of the investigation, will not include the investigation of individual officers for their actions, but only the actions of the PBP as an agency, with any investigations of individuals to be carried out by the PBP, OMI, the CPRB, or by other agencies with applicable jurisdiction; This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring.6 months
2. Reviewing the current policies, procedures and training of the PBP for use of all of these weapons, to see whether or not these conform with current industry standards and best practices;This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring.6 months
3. Making recommendations for how any of the PBP’s policies, procedures, and training must change conform to come up to industry standards and best practices; This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring.6 months
4. The publication of a report on these items to be made public.  To the extent that the report advises banning any particular crowd control device or tool, it will be banned.This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring.6 months
The use of “kettling” or other tactics designed to contain or trap protesters must end.  Kettling is a crowd-control technique used by the police. Also known as "trap and detain,” police use this tactic to surround protesters in a confined space so they cannot leave and cannot obey orders to disperse. Once police block people from getting out, failure to disperse may be used as a pretext for arrest. Use of this tactic in this fashion may allow police to assert control, but it also enhances the danger of violence and subjects protesters who would otherwise leave peacefully to arrest.  A tactic with these downsides must be confined to the few situations in which it might be used to calm and defuse violence, not to escalate it or create new criminal charges and more resentment of police actions.  If it cannot be limited to such situations through a defined policy (pursuant to the independent organization’s investigation -- see Fourth recommendation, below) that does not allow its use against protesters not using violence, it must cease.The PBP does not utlizie "Kettling" techniques or tactics.Complete
The Pittsburgh Bureau of Police (PBP) will revise its policies and procedures to reflect the findings of the independent investigation, and to revamp its training to reflect these new policies and procedures.This is currently happening, and the investigation prior to the report is occurring.6 months
All PBP officers, starting with command staff, will be retrained on these new policies with said revamped training.  No officer at any level who has not been retrained will be deployed to any situation during which crowd control devices may need to be used.The PBP will work on implementation after the report comes out, and polices are amended/adjusted as needed.1 year
New policies will be reviewed annually.The PBP currently reviews ALL policies every two years.The PBP will take under advisement the review of policies on an annual basis, rather than biannually.

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